Active Focus my take

I think there are two kinds of active focus. I think of them as pushing and pulling. When something is just on the edge of your blur horizon and only a little blurry then you push that bubble to get it clear that is the push, this is easier, it takes some thought but not much effort. Not unlike pushing a shopping cart you have to be mindful of it but it is easy enough. Or tuning back in to the clock you know is ticking, you stop hearing it over time but If you listen you can hear it again. This is the first one people get I think. The bubble snaps back for a while but then you are able to keep it at that new range and can start pushing again, with a new edge. This is the AF all the time variety, and seems to result in a steady type of gain.
Then there is pulling focus, this is harder and takes real effort to learn (this is the one that is most impressive, but can have a price when you over do it, therefore should seriously be eased into). For me this is when something is far past my blur edge but I’m able to clear it, frequently to crystal clear (though more often to double vision) by willing myself to see it. This is harder to sustain too because of the effort. I tend to think of this one as the hard core training, I try to do 3-5 sessions a day with this but only for a few minutes at a time. I have a theory that the this is the key to larger gains, or at least faster ones, though I have no doubt pushing focus alone would work just fine to have gains, as long as distance vision and outdoor time were properly applied. But I think mixing in the harder pull is helping, if for no other reason than how encouraging it is. I literally pulled focus on the moon without glasses one night and could see the creators, (full disclosure there was two of them lol) I haven’t seen the moon with my own un"corrected" eyes since I was a kid!
I am still trying to translate this for less than ideal light circumstances (tips and tricks appreciated) since I can’t do much of any focus in artificial, and/or low light (unless it is a light source itself like the moon).
Anyways thoughts? Experiences?

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Yes, that matches what I’m learning here on EM. I’ve been doing the push version. Focusing on a distance object and consciously tensing the ciliary muscle to get a little extra clarity. It’s quite easy for me to hold even for minutes at a time when stationary.
The other type I’ve seen people mention on EM but no idea what was involved. Pulled the moon sounds awesome!

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It was awesome! I joke with my kids and tell them I’m honing my super powers :joy: I was so bummed when it was too overcast the following nights to try to repeat it. From the sound of it you are doing well with AF so you should be able to do some pull soon. Fair warning though it’s easy to get excited and go over board, you will likely be rewarded poorly for it, nothing a good scalp massage and/ or a warm compress won’t relieve though.

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Are your eyes relaxed when going the pulling? I ask, because the push version is a tensing not a relaxing and @halmadavid wrote here

For me push is when something is at the edge of blur and I blink and it clears
Pulling well that came when all the copies of a blurred image merged into one

I think my brain likes to pull active focus bc for quite some time what I get with glasses off is more double vision than blur and given leg up from reduced lenses I learned to upgrade double vision into a single clear image. I can sometimes do this with a blink too but holding that focus strains my eyes

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My eyes are fairly relaxed, and my sinus clear (that is a good feeling) but I get a tension/pulling sensation across my forehead and pressure in my ears if I pull focus too long. It is something maybe that will pass with more practice I think. All those systems are interconnected I’m thinking all this flexing of eye muscles is putting sensations on the rest that they haven’t had for 20 years or more… so I try to go easy and see if I can build on it like adding more weight at the gym, you don’t walk in and dead lift 150 lbs first time out, you work up to it, at least that is my hopes lol

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I always think it is funny that everyone compares AF with lifting weights at the gym.
Actually when doing active focus, you are relaxing your muscles. People who are doing it often may even be stretching their cilliary muscles.

I do agree you should not overdo ‘training’. Especially the pulling you talk about. Your eyes contain muscles that are build just like any other muscle. Stretching too much can have some complications for your muscles. So in my opinion you have to be careful with it.

I want my axial length to become shorter. Not my cilliary muscle to become longer. :slight_smile:

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It’s a relatable analogy considering we are engaging a muscle…
I do primarily push, but I like a challenge too and it is exceptionally exciting to pull something into focus that seemed like a long shot. Though you raise a fair point about axial length shortening being the primary goal, I suppose I didn’t think of it as stretching the muscle so much. Thanks for your input I shall research that angle.

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I can’t active focus when there is a little bit of blur, never could don’t know why. For my eyes to active focus things have to be really blurry as you described in the second kind of “pulling” focus.

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I’m the same way. If it’s a little bit of blur, I don’t try to active focus. If it’s noticeably blurry, my subconscious tells me to active focus.

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I didn’t dream of doing AF in the moon. But now I can’t wait to try!

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I mean looking at the moon not in the moon :smile:

A bit offtopic, but I had dreams several times in the last few months where I was doing active focus :smiley:

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Lol I took your meaning the modern era skill set includes but is not limited to reading through autocorrect fails and typos as if they aren’t even there. I found best success on the full moon, but to be honest with all the rain that was like the only night I have even seen the moon at all since discovered AF. But I know that without glasses in the past it is just a bright blur. There was still a haze typical of light sources for people with myopia but I was able to cut through it enough to see clean round edges and the textures and color variations created by the creators. I’m counting the days to the next full moon and crossing my fingers it won’t be obscured by clouds. Maybe by then I can manage to only see one :joy:

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The subconscious is a funny thing, and it feeds on your daily activities lol

I really like an analogy Jake had in one of his many vids. He said initially, AF is like the autofocus on one of those early digital cameras. It was slow and, could only lock in on something that wasn’t moving, and would sometimes hunt around. As you hone the skill, it gets better and better, and eventually can lock in quickly and track moving objects like a newer high quality camera.

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I’ve also found that there are 2 ways of focusing, pusing and pulling.
Usually I noticed that pusing ecomes less effective after some time, and then switch automatically to pulling. It seems as if pulling does te eavy lifting and pusing seems more like maintenance of te current level. Also found tat focusing close and ten far away 'stretces" my distance vision en improves it quickly during te day.

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Yeah! I do the shifting focus too. It is a great warm up for optimum pull. I pick 3-4 points more or less in line with the last being as far as I can see and count up spending twice as long on the far point before bringing it back in, after a few of those my eyes are prime for the best AF

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I active focus in different ways.

  1. Sometimes a stare clears the image up.
  2. By “tracing” around a far off object with the eyes, like a sharp edge of a roof or a window - somehow sharpens the image and decreases the blur.
  3. Looking “through” a signboard to the scenery behind it will bring the letters into focus.
  4. I’ve even have tried talking to and telling my ciliary to relax! To get that stinging, oniony sensation in the eye, so often linked to Active Focus.
  5. Blinking one eye at a time, alternately - this tends to clear up the image in my other eye.
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I’m very new to this site and method, and have yet to investigate active focus of any kind, but I do relate to your moon story. I have always seen three moons with uncorrected eyes, and have learned to live with this SciFi version of the world :smile:

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