Active focus visual guide

I already posted this on Facebook and people seem to like it, so I’ll post it here as well.

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This is what I was trying to get out in another thread called Active Focus Demo:

https://community.endmyopia.org/search?q=active%20focus%20demo

I keep thinking that anytime we can get someone to experience initial active focus, or even just WANT to experience initial active focus, we’ve gotten the person much closer to buying into EM. A visual guide is a powerful piece of that puzzle.

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What’s the consensus here on triangulation, the Bates thing that Mark his-name-shall-not-be-mentioned used in videos as his own magical method, for finding active focus?

For a while that was kind of a popular one and people have been saying it’s helped them find active focus. Any thoughts on that here?

A struggle for me since I can’t replicate it personally (already have active focus), and also had to get over being annoyed about the attempts at capitalizing on our name to promote another thing.

Ultimately though as always, curious to keep improving our approach, and active focus really is the main newbies sticking point.

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I’m in that camp - I fell into active focus somewhat naturally, so I really can’t evaluate any of the descriptions of how to do it from a personal standpoint.

The trouble here is that while the triangulation may help some people, the idea that because Mark did well that that everyone with -5 and below is only a year from being out of glasses just doesn’t add up. So, on the one hand, we have an approach that some people are saying helps them find active focus, and on the other, we have logical conclusions that can’t be reached on the basis on one person’s personal reports. What do we do with that?

I’m in that camp - I fell into active focus somewhat naturally, so I really can’t evaluate any of the descriptions of how to do it from a personal standpoint.

The trouble here is that while the triangulation may help some people, the idea that because Mark did well that that everyone with -5 and below is only a year from being out of glasses just doesn’t add up. So, on the one hand, we have an approach that some people are saying helps them find active focus, and on the other, we have logical conclusions that can’t be reached on the basis on one person’s personal reports. What do we do with that?

I learned active focus just by doing trial and error method. Took me few months to finally realize how to do it, but if I had more faith that all this endmyopia is a real thing and not a scam, I believe I could have learned it way sooner.

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The other problem I have with active focus is…it has changed for me somewhat as I’ve dropped diopters and gotten more used to using my eyes more naturally.

I also knew active focus before Mark, but his method helped me make my active focus more powerful. Not the triangulation (most likely I was already too advanced to get any effect from that), but the advanced version of it, when you try to see the whole scene at once and try to watch how the different object move differently in the “3D space”. In his latest video he speak about it directly, but it’s hinted in his triangulation videos too. I’ve written more about my experience and how to find it (in non-Mark terms, I don’t really like this whole triangulation thing), here: Peripheral Vision. Most likely it’s not related to peripheral vision that much, but giving more attention to peripheral vision helps because it nudges you out of your “usual” (at least for me it’s definitely usual) focusing with “tunnel vision” mode.

Ultimately it helped me with: eliminate ciliary spasm faster after a long close-up session (in the ballpark of minutes, instead of 15-20 mins), helps my active focus be more powerful (“clear more dioptre”) and helps engaging my active focus in environments it’s hard to do (low contrast, dawn / dusk, generally low light environments).

I also have a theory that this whole “paying attention to the whole visual field” can be a key to unlock close-up without (much) ciliary spasm, but I cannot get into the habit to do close-up with full field vision, so I cannot prove / confirm it (yet) :slight_smile:

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I like the pictures, but have problem with mentioning eye muscles and saying things like “flexing your eye muscles”, “pull these eye muscles some more”, etc. I mean, yes, ultimately it will be some muscles, but beginners biggest problems usually that they think they should “feel” active focus like they feel when they flex their biceps, and that they think that active focus should be a conscious and contracting thing like (again) flexing their biceps.
But in practice it’s the total opposite: you won’t feel anything when active focus happens, also you most likely have to relax and not flex to make it happen and it’s definitely not a conscious muscle movement, but much more like how you breathe (even if you control your breath you don’t do it like flexing this and that muscle, you simply “want” to stop your breath and your body do whatever it needed to do).

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I like this one and I think you’re on the right track here with something that could benefit people who need help finding AF. One thing I would like to add is that I use an array of different blinking techniques to get AF to trigger, besides ‘blink blink’.

If I want to clear somehing up I’ll try different techinques until something works (while focusing/staring on the unclear object)

  1. A normal blink
  2. A couple of rapid normal blinks, a.k.a ‘blink blink’
  3. Closing my eyes for 2-3 seconds, opening them normally
  4. Closing my eyes for 2-3 seconds, opening them fast
  5. Hard blink
  6. Closing my eyes for 2-3 seconds, opening only the dominant eye, then opening the weak eye 3-5 seconds later (without blinking)
  7. Same as a bove, except opening the weak eye first

If it still doesnt work I repeat #4 over and over until it works. This one seems to be the most effective one for me. Now that I think about it cant remember the last time I had to repeat this more than 3 times to make it work.

I personally havent had much luck with Marks method but I wouldnt write it off as different people find AF in a lot of different ways. I agree with @halmadavid that being aware of the peripherals seem to help, especially outdoors.

Maybe it will go away eventually but I definitely feel a “tightness” in the eyes during AF

Which means you do some unnecessary thing with your eye / face muscles during AF. Most likely exactly because of the conscious / unconscious assumption that using eye muscles should lead to some “tightness” feeling, just like when you move your other muscles. And that’s what I really would not want to reinforce in people.

The brain-part of vision calculating depth somehow, I thought it’s subconscious and can only be simplified this way. Millions of angles of light!

I have tried the triangulation method. As a high myope, at the beginning of the EM road, active focusing does not just happen all the time, 100%. I found the triangulation to work occasionally. But as a method of improving eyesight consistently, I think it lacks something (a lot?)

In my opinion, the best way to say it is that active focusing includes triangulation, while triangulation is just a small part of the active focusing. Active Focusing I believe will lead to consistent, long term, eye sight improvement. Triangulation alone seems will only help with retraining/restoring/maintaining peripheral vision - an important element, but not sufficient on its own.

Again, as a high myope, I find it hard to figure out how in heaven’s name you just take your glasses off and start triangulation, and expect to start seeing things. From my side of the story, this is not feasible. The answer is bigger than that. And after almost 3 months on EM, I will stick with Jake’s solution. Slow and steady, and consistent.

I believe in miracles, and triangulation is not it for me. Besides, the whole (loooong) journey to get somewhere sometimes seems more important than just being handed something.

Again, just my opinion. (I do wish sometimes for my eye sight to be restored miraculously :wink: :innocent:)

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I believe all those methods like triangulation are just useless. It’s impossible to describe how to AF and the best way you can show it how it’s done is with visuals so they know how to expect and then they can understand their goal. Anyways I learned how to AF after wearing reading glasses 24/7 (no I don’t go outside very often). So my theory is, once you lock your eyes in a way that you have 0 close-up, it becomes so relaxed that they become in a state where AF becomes possible.

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Thank you for sharing the visuals! At least I know what it should look like!

I think I fall in this category.
Tl;dr : Yes,I think clear flashes with these techniques could’ve helped me find AF. At least, this made be believe initially eyes could improve. Also AF improves after doing some Bates exercise.
Long answer :
I started in August with differentials 1.25 less than og power. I’m a high myope (8.5).
I had watched both yours and Mark’s videos.
This Diff was giving 60cm at laptop and I haven’t found AF.
As I didn’t had normalized, I used to do the triangulation, peripheral, movement thing on car number plates with diffs. My eyes would tear up and I got a clear flash. So these were giving clear flash, not AF but my eyes were improving.
After 1 month, my edge of blur was 90cm.
But even at this point I didn’t knew if I can AF.
When I got my new diff(-2 less) and first Norm(-1 less), I realized I can clear things and make them sharp at edge of blur. ( Like sharpening leaves of trees by staring).
AF doesn’t produce tears.
Also, being aware of peripheral in both diff and norm helps me better AF. It’s like if things are moving in periphery I can have sharper central vision.
While on my laptop, I have a chart at about 9ft. I like to clear some lines using clear flash on that using diffs. Clearing out small things with diffs(which are little far from diff distance) helps me to improve overall vision.
Also, I had seen some floaters, never noticed them earlier. These may be due to clear flash as @Laos once mentioned.
Sorry for the long post :sweat_smile:

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