🤔 Axial Length Changes with Shifts of Gaze Direction in Myopes

Not sure what to say about this one (submitted by a reader via e-mail).

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It makes me think that the debate is far from closed and the mind should be kept sufficiently open.

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So for people who end up struggling with progress if their means of active focus are mostly with differentials at a computer or smart phone, you can show them this in support of the claim that outdoor time is better. Or maybe they’ll just mount their monitors on their ceiling and strap their phones to their caps. :upside_down_face:

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Lol. Bates probably would have loved this study.

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This is a bit rough for us with droopy eyelids - matchsticks required. :crazy_face:

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Yea that was the context I got the link with. :joy:

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So Varakari shouldn’t look sideways too long before his axial length measurements?

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Extraocular muscles affecting (short term) the optics of the eye? Hmmmmm… :wink:

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Can’t comment on length, but I can reliably induce some awful astigmatism effects on my left eye by looking out a corner of my eye for longer than is wise. Don’t much care what the cause is, only that it’s relatively temporary.

There is a woman who was known for bulging her eyes out. Her name is Kim Goodman and she used to do commercials as a “WOW” response to whatever product. I’m so curious how her extraocular muscles change her visual perception. She didn’t go in depth on it in an interview and just mentioned vision gets doubled, but she wears glasses,so there’s that.

I try spend about an hour a day out of glasses. To keep the vision unrestricted and use periphery, uninfluenced colour perception etc. I’ve always wondered if glasses affect the tilt of the head :face_with_monocle:

There’s a job I don’t want. Everrrrrr.

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As I don’t wear glasses I have full use of my peripheral vision and even for the -5.75 left eye, it functions. I am working at my laptop at my kitchen table under an overhead light, and as it is very early here, the rest of the kitchen is quite dark. Yet I still caught the scurry of my kitchen mouse in the outer peripheral vision of my left eye. This is at a distance of about 2.5 metres.
I am not sure where I stand in this debate between eye movement and head/neck movement. I am tempted to compare it to hearing. As we do not have ears that can change their orientation with muscles, we tend to orient our head to try to catch faint sounds. Of course we do have extraocular eye muscles, but would it not make sense to orient the head as well so as not to overstrain these muscles. What is caught in peripheral vision that seems of relevance to us, will immediately provoke a turning of the head to see more clearly what it is.
I drive on very quiet country roads. A real danger is having a deer (or wild boar) dart out of the woods at the side of the road. right in front of the car. I would have to catch this in peripheral vision to have the time to react. The tunnel vision of strong corrective glasses might make me miss this peripheral signal. I do still wear glasses to drive, but am looking forward to not having to do so any more.

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Bates said all the accommodation is done by the oblique muscle contraction.

So he probably would very much agree with the study

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Damn, I just used the Saitama-OK reaction image seconds ago! Can’t use it in rapid succession without looking arbitrary.

Seriously though, while mildly interesting, this doesn’t seem like a huge revelation. Less than 20 µm change from turning the eye, which changes all kinds of pressures on it? If anything, this shows how strongly the eye resists being changed by outside forces.

Eyes are usually over 20 mm long. So… less than a thousandth of change in the direction of most extreme deviation in the test, measured while staring sideways for minutes… OK.

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Where’s your sense of humor, Georg.

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I dunno, I mean, people are serious on this stuff, including those who see this as evidence for Bates or whatever. Sometimes I’m unsure whether to laugh or rant about it.

Maybe should do both :crazy_face: :face_with_symbols_over_mouth: :rofl:

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I think that was it…joke is on the rest of us (and how well our eyes resist big deformations).

@Varakari, Nyah Nyah Nyah Nyah…joke is on those scientists since their deformations were mostly resisted by our eyes!

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@Varakari, there was also a guy who intentionally induced high myopia by incyclorotating (his words) his eyes about the z-axis (torsional), in the name of science…I kid you not. What a knuckleheaded idea! I rarely insult ideas, but come on! You have to admit that one is pretty un-smart.

Google it…bet it’s still online after all those years. Reminds me of those other stories I sent you a while back about people inducing myopia intentionally, don’t you think? Those people were nuts!