Bringing up Endmyopia

Love this. Great news. I keep my centimeter tape measurement on my coffee table and when people visit they are always very curious. I’m planning on making a poster based to measure my eyesight instead of the standard Snellen. Will follow your lead and place it on my living room to plant some more seds on people’s minds.

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Yes. I’ve also found people are lazy, but I don’t know if it is actually disbelief mixed with politeness. Gifting differentials is great idea. I’m always asking people what their prescription is, they don’t know, so I guess I would have to accompany them to the optic shop to get their glasses tested.

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I usually bring up a conversation about glasses or eye health or something along the lines of “I can read that small text, can you?” to see if they are interested in having healthy vision or not, so you know if it’s worth the time to explain endmyopia to them or not.

Tried convincing my sister to join me in my quest to get rid of my visual crutches. Her response was “I don’t care if I’m -11 or -9, it’s all the same to me”. I told her that we could get rid of our diopters completely with patience and perseverance but she refuses to believe that lifestyle changes can reduce her dependence on glasses/contacts completely.

Her loss I guess. Can’t wait to see the look on her face when my prescription falls below hers for the first time ever!

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I told my sister about it and she told me (half jokingly) I’m on my way to becoming a “anti vaxxing nudist hippie”. None of which I am. :joy:

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I would just say: “Yes m’am, and proud of it too :stuck_out_tongue:!”

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I tell whoever asks me about it. That’d be my parents. They have never had any problems with myopia, so I’m not sure what they think. It went something like this:
Me and my dad:

Dad: Hey, what are you looking at there?
Me: I’m trying to read that sign over there.
Dad: Why?
Me: I’m rehabilitating my vision back to normal.
Dad: Oh, cool. I can see very far into the distance no problem.

:smile:

Me and my mom:

Mom: Hey, what are you looking at there?
Me: I’m trying to read that sign over there.
Mom: You can’t read it? Let’s go to an eye doctor to check you out.
Me: Thanks, mom, I’m fine. I’m rehabilitating my vision. You just need to try to focus on distant text and take frequent breaks from doing close-up work in order to improve.
Mom: Okay, just be careful not to ruin your eyes.
Me: LOL, sure mom, your son is a medical doctor himself. He knows what he’s doing.
Mom: Okay, but I still would like it if you visited an eye doctor.

:smile:

And I’ve told only one person who didn’t ask me about it. It was my brother. He was interested in it but is not practicing the teachings. Old habits die hard, I guess. :smile: Maybe when I’ll have some tangible progress and show it to him it will motivate him.

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Being an example seems the best way. But the other part is that even when people dismiss you or just plain aren’t interested, there’s something cool that happens when you hear the truth: you don’t forget it. It just kind of lodges in the back of your mind.

My truth that I can tell others now is that I went from wearing x dioptres to y dioptres and seeing clearer than ever and I’m super excited about it. If they’re interested, I can go into the truth of how the eye works. Some day when they’re ready they’ll at least know it’s possible!

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I have the weird idea of upgrading your life over time (a nice side effect of getting rid of myopia shackles) may be most inspiring. Myopia is just the tip of the ice berg for many of us.

(from a guy who used to spend 14 hours staring at a screen of squiggly lines just to increase numbers on another screen)

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I’m trying to spread the word, but for most people I can almost hear their brain flatlining.
So far I haven’t managed yet to entice a single soul among my acquaintances.

I’m trying to convince my brother to attempt it before considering a permanent LASIK operation. He used to have better eyesight than mine, but it all changed when he took on a desk job. I hope he’s at least following my suggestion of using weaker lenses for up close.

Maybe once I gain meaningul reductions my words will carry more weight. My ciliary body is still far from regaining its full flexibility and keeping the good habits is still a challenge.

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It almost seems like the industry is set up to provide the “service” without the knowledge.

This really resonates. People not only don’t know what their measurements are, they have no idea how these things are measured. So it makes sense that at some point they discover how blind they’ve become. Up to that point, they accept new glasses as “tweaks.”

You know, there’s a lot of truth in counterculture. I’m not anti vaxxer, but I definitely am wary of the health industry and the “solutions” they offer which seem less than natural.

It’s too easy for most of the people to be misled. And they are.

This seems a pretty consistent experience among us trying to tell other people about EM.

There’s a number of ideas as to why. I view it through the experience - belief - actions - results concept. Imagine you’re the average person wearing eyeglasses. That looks like this:

  1. You notice one day that your distance vision is blurry
  2. You ask those around you what to do, who all say that your eyes don’t work right (they’re broken), so you go to an “eye doctor,” who confirms that your eyes are broken and the only solution is to buy eyeglasses.
  3. Consequently, you believe that some people “need glasses” (you’re one of them). Going forward, your eyes only ever get worse, and you don’t know anyone whose vision has ever gotten better.
  4. Thus, based on your belief that your eyes are broken, you wear glasses all the time, and your vision continues to get worse.

One day, someone comes along and says, “did you know that you can improve your vision? I found this thing on the internet and I’ve been doing it!” You are thinking, “why have I never heard of this? I’m going to go with the professionals opinion here. If you could improve your vision, surely the eye doctor or someone I know would have told me.”

Hence, my current best guess as to how to get people interested in EM is to experience active focus.
Perhaps if people have a taste of seeing more clearly, even for just a moment, then we can disrupt this cycle of experience - belief - actions - results by directly giving people the experience of better vision, so that they then ask the questions that lead them to find EM.

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I think it’s even worse than this. People literally need glasses to function yet believe it’s only a temporary condition or that it really doesn’t apply to them. Denial is the oddest thing everrrrrr.

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Yes, denial is very strange. What we’re up against is that almost no one knows about EM or vision improvement. That is, if you ask the average person wearing glasses if vision can be improved and if they know anyone who has ever improved it, no one will say yes.

For us, as early adopters, our hope has to be that the people we tell about EM will eventually run into someone else who tells them, something will click, and the knowledge will spread. It’s definitely going to take time.

Yes, denial is very strange. What we’re up against is that almost no one knows about EM or vision improvement. That is, if you ask the average person wearing glasses if vision can be improved and if they know anyone who has ever improved it, no one will say yes.

For us, as early adopters, our hope has to be that the people we tell about EM will eventually run into someone else who tells them, something will click, and the knowledge will spread. It’s definitely going to take time.

This is true of 99.999 % of “experts” (board certified practicing opto people) too. Grr.

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