Changes in axis number

Hello everyone!
Another confusion with my new prescription. Last week, I went to my optometrist for Eye check up and only changes in prescription is axis number. Eye specialist told me that you should wear eyeglasses with axis of 90° and he didn’t told me the reason. My optician said you should not change anything in your prescription. My new prescription with axis change is -3.50/-0.50×90°® and -4.00/-0.50×90°(L). Only changes in prescription is axis number which was earlier 105° in right eye and 70° in left eye. I thought I should not order my new glasses unless I get much knowledge about it.
Should I change my axis number or not and what will be the effects if changed?

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I had a very large shift in axis in my left eye since my last prescription a long time ago. I discovered this by rotating my individual lenses to test each eye separately, until I got the clearest vision. This is clumsy, as you have to fold the earpiece of the lens and need to find a clear part of the lens to look through. As my earpieces were very thin, this did not interfere too much. This will tell you if the axis in your current glasses is way off. Then you can use the astigmatism axis measuring tool provided on the blog, and also in your 7day email introduction. I used this, and another astigmatism dial provided by one of the forum members, to correctly calculate my own astigmatism axis, confirmed by the pair of glasses that I then ordered online on the basis of this. I tested them by again rotating each lens to see if I could find better clarity at another angle, and as I did not, I knew I had measured correctly.
It is disturbing that your eye specialist and your optician cannot agree, so I suggest you do your own measurements to try to find out who is right.
In any case, if you follow the endmyopia journey, you will soon be getting rid of your .50 astigmatism, and it will no longer be an issue. Are you planning a reduction based on your current presription, and a pair of differentials for close work? If so, and you have not yet discovered it, there is lots of information on the blog and the forum on how to go about this, although actual diopter advice should not be given, and it is up to you to figure it out for yourself. Good luck.:slightly_smiling_face:

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Thank you very much for your reply. Hannie! I didn’t asked any diopter specific advice. And I also know that I should go with the prescription that makes me comfortable and gives clear vision. I actuality want to know the reasons that why my eye specialist told me to wear glasses that have axis number 90°. Hope you get it😊

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Did you think to try the spherical equivalent? At such low cyl values,it should be more comfortable

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I am sorry if I implied that you were asking for diopter specific advice, because you certainly did not. Above all, I wanted to avoid giving you any diopter specific advice. I will be a little bolder here, and suggest that the difference in recommended axes is probably not significant enough for you to change glasses only for that, especially if you are planned to reduce cylinder soon. It is possible that the eye specialist made a more careful measure of your axes of astigmatism than the optician, or vice versa. Did either of them measure your astigmatism on an autorefractor? It seems that an autorefractor, although unreliable for spherical diopter measurements, is good for measuring cylinder axis -possibly better than a test lens measurement, which depends a lot on your subjective responses. If both of them used an autorefractor, then I am stumped. I am basing this on what I have learned so far on the journey, and do not have any expertise in this. Maybe some of the more learned and experienced members of our forum can give a better explanation of different measurement tools and their margins of error.

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Yeah optician used his autorefractor but eye specialist did his all test manually (means without any huge machine)

That probably explains it. So perhaps no need to change your glasses.:grinning:

Actually I didn’t thought about it and also I do not want to mess with my focal planes and I think going slowly will be a great idea.

Only -0.50 astigmatism in each eye? I think it’s a fantastic ocasion to forget about it. Then no more trouble to think what degree to choose :rofl: This is what I would do if I were you. Just wait for wiser opinions, however.

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Just check the blog for ‘reducing prescription complexity’.

Go to another optometrists, ask him to put a lens with both suggested degrees on your eye, as well as a lense where it is converted into sph.

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I will do the same when I get next normalized. I am only thinking to reduce my spherical value. I have already eliminated astigmatism values in my differentials.

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Okay I will take a look to ‘reducing prescription complexity’.

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