Differentials for different jobs

Hi there !
I can’t seem to find this subject anywhere on facebook or the forum, so I’m creating this thread. Maybe it’s not really important but it’s a question I have.
I guess most people here have the usual desk job, it is my case too, I’m either studying on a book or working on a computer. But are there any people here with different jobs with maybe a variable close-up activity ? For example a job in construction, or other outdoor stuff, like grape picking (I will be doing this soon) where the eyes can move around more than with the typical desk job ? How are you using your differentials in this case ? Just calculating the average close-up distance ? I guess that would be the thing to do.
Thank you for your answers !

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I hate fixed distance and/or computer job, so I am very interested in answer as well.
I asked a question about IT work and endmyopia, though now I realize IT basically isn’t for me…

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Picking grapes would not be considered close-up work requiring differentials. See the EM wiki:

https://wiki.endmyopia.org/wiki/Close-up

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Oh yeah I already saw this video, but for some reason I was still considering picking grapes as close-up time since it is hours and hours of close-up vision :thinking: that’s weird !

Well, I never picked very many grapes, but I don’t remember being at one set distance for a prolonged period. Plus I didn’t stare at them. But then I was a teen. Is it so very close? Perhaps it is more taxing than I estimate.

I’d say if it is rows and rows of grapes to pick for hours and hours, most probably you can wear differentials only. But if you wear normalised that will not ruin your eyesight either - as you are not focusing on small text on a small screen but your eyes will move around and change distances continuously.

EM encourages getting differentials for one main close up distance. Most people have one most typical distance which is typically the screen. But there are a few people who have a certain close up distance during working hours which is not on a screen and a different after work which is on a screen. E.g. a primary school teacher being with kids in the classroom and then doing the admin work on screen and anyway spending time on screens after work. Shop assistants working in the aisles or people in the hospitality industry working in restaurants or hotels can be in a similar situation. Or all kinds of repairmen can be the same. Or just anyone doing household chores at home if that lasts for a longer time.
They may use normalised for the non-screen time or if that feels too clear, too much, they can get a pair of glasses in between normalised and screen-differentials. It’s up to personal preference.

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