Endmyopia Interview: The Burn It Nutrition Podcast

Endmyopia Interview On Burn It Nutrition :studio_microphone::heart:

We had a great chat with Joseph. Check out his podcast too, lots of interesting guests and discussions!

https://burnitnutrition.com/podcast103/

Looks like there are right now seven more podcasts we did interviews on that are still in the pipeline to be published. Some big ones!

More on the schedule, and getting a few fellow endmyopians on our own podcast to talk 20/20 gains.

5 Likes

I was glad you gave him some guidance there at the end. It sounded like he was going to conclude with “screw it I just won’t wear my glasses anymore” instead of the small changes route. It’s funny how the concepts take a little while to soak in, even for people who are paying attention.

2 Likes

There is many really great stuff in this podcast, love the way you tie in keto, and some not good things.
The ad interupts are annoying. And found myself not wanting to listen. The bit about plastic infront of your eyes compared to drugs didn’t sound right. I mean it’s not because it’s plastic, it’s because the plastic does things without it could be very dangerous.

For these podcasts with general audience. Which is most people don’t have glasses. As you dive into improving vision you lose much of the audience as they aren’t wearing glasses, plus you have to start using technical terms and I think many people would switch off at that point.

I think a better tact (let the podcaster know ahead of time) would be to spend the most of the podcast on prevention, explaining how to keep good vision, good habits and how to teach good habits to kids - especially in light of recent trends of more close up because of new technology and indoor time from modern life/covid. Then if appropriate progress later in the podcast about what can be done if you have glasses.

Depends on where are there listeners :slight_smile:

The [study](https:// In Singapore, the prevalence of myopia was 11.0% in Chinese children aged 6 to 72 months,44 29.0% in 7 year olds, 34.7% in 8 year olds, and 53.1% in 9 year olds.4 In Hong Kong, the myopia prevalence was 17.0% in children younger than 7 years, which increased to 37.5% in 8 year olds and 53.1% in children older than 11 years.45 In Korea, the prevalence of myopia by age group was 50% in 5 to 11 year olds, 78% in 12 to 18 year olds, and 45.7% in high school students.46 In China, the prevalence of myopia in urban children ranged from 5.7% in 5 year olds, 30.1% in 10 year olds, and increased to 78.4% in 15 year olds.) is about children, but I think it’s not wrong to assume that the adult population is not much better. Also the study is 5 years old, so some of them are already adult.

In Singapore, the prevalence of myopia was 11.0% in Chinese children aged 6 to 72 months,44 29.0% in 7 year olds, 34.7% in 8 year olds, and 53.1% in 9 year olds. In Hong Kong, the myopia prevalence was 17.0% in children younger than 7 years, which increased to 37.5% in 8 year olds and 53.1% in children older than 11 years. In Korea, the prevalence of myopia by age group was 50% in 5 to 11 year olds, 78% in 12 to 18 year olds, and 45.7% in high school students. In China, the prevalence of myopia in urban children ranged from 5.7% in 5 year olds, 30.1% in 10 year olds, and increased to 78.4% in 15 year olds.

In Sweden, the prevalence of myopia was 49.7% in 12 to 13 year olds.

In the United Kingdom, the prevalence was 49% in adults aged 44 years

I don’t think that’s really useful. I think we can assume that most listener of these podcast are adults. It’s relatively rare, especially beyond 30 that someone develops myopia if they did not had as a child, or did not developed when they started working. So if they listen to these and don’t have myopia they most likely have the rights habit, and won’t have problem with it later.

1 Like

Is does. It’s not a podcast to children in chinese or signapore so the point still stand.
Also speaking about habits and prevention applies to everyone.

Source please. I don’t believe that is accurate, and at best misleading such as small sample size or just straight made up. There is no offical body in the UK that keeps such records.

It’s because of modern technology encourages close-up screen time, especially since the smart phone(~2010-2015) which wasn’t previously an option. Case in point my brother started wearing minus glasses as 55 within a year of getting an iPad.

Sorry, wanted to include: https://journals.lww.com/apjoo/fulltext/2016/11000/epidemiology_of_myopia.2.aspx

1 Like

Nothing about United Kindom prevalence in the nearest sources. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1034/j.1600-0420.2002.800508.x

Wow, that’s weird… I was surprised by that high number honestly. I’ve only could find this:

Which reports much lower number (30ish).

1 Like

Not sure how we quantify ‘most’. More than 50% in much of the developed world, looks like (look up percentages I don’t have a good global data set saved - wish I had one! -, but if memory serves …). And yes, not every topic will apply to every person. I’ll take 50% gladly, considering that odds that there is myopia somewhere in the family is going to be higher than 50%. I agree with the prevention angle, though most of endmyopia is about reversing myopia.

Podcast hosts decide in advance whether this discussion is relevant to their audience, so I generally defer to their assessment. Though admittedly I don’t have additional data on things like listen times of our episode vs. others. :thinking:

You can buy pain killers over the counter that will kill you if you overdose. The government says people can manage that just fine. How un-manageable is figuring out clear curved plastic lenses, compared to that? Can we expect people to not kill themselves with painkillers, but not figure out glasses? Will you notice quite rapidly if you wear the wrong glasses (or none), and make adjustments accordingly?

That’s my attempted point. How are these relatively benign and easy to use things ‘prescriptions’ while plenty of more risky substances are not.

True. Also worth noting that I spend a ton of time and resources getting on these podcasts. From full time staff dealing with contacting and scheduling, to dragging around video and audio gear everywhere, to often early mornings or late evenings to actually be on these shows. I do love feedback and insights since I’m often too close to things - though also bear in mind that none of this adventure is some casual chat that just so happens to have been recorded. :joy:

Lots more coming. A fair few of these are listed as “top 1%” by Listennotes, though … grains of salt on all that audience data.

Yea, that one also not my favorite for sure. Though beyond my control.

I mostly pick podcasts with decent audience size, assuming from this that the host knows what he’s doing. Notably I barely get the chance to listen to one or two other episodes fro many given podcast. Often they do have some good nuggets from various other guests. :grimacing::+1:t2:

3 Likes

I remember listening to the Higherside chat podcast and the guy saying the he was already considering contacting you, but then he got contact from your PR team and he was like “Man, I also need some PR people” :rofl:

2 Likes

Funny. Actually another guy in the HIgherside group of friends e-mailed me the other day, asking endmyopia to be an episode on his casts of pods.

PR turning into custom coding to drill down on most desirable contacts and apps to manage contacts and follow-up and all kinds of things. I never stop being amazed how many moving parts there are to doing anything properly. At least won’t easily fade into getting old at this rate, constantly having to learn new stuff.

Also weirdly my tendency to want to tinker and poke at tech and ideas that makes endmyopia the perfect ongoing procrastination project. :joy:

2 Likes