Eye Frustration

There is an amazing amount of times 1 day is a good eye day and then there is an immediate bad day. I think to myself how can I ever convince anyone to try this endmyopia when most people would not try beyond the first frustration. I myself am trying to discover what makes a bad day right after a really good day. I started the morning bad and I barely touched my phone and since I enjoy the outdoors as my job I had plenty of sunshine and it still did not resolve. I know I will work it out but man I dont know how I could get a person to try unless they are the right kind of person.

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They need to be fed up enough with the status quo and hate glasses enough, I guess

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That’s it, exactly. Have to be motivated. Of the dozen or so people I’ve recommended this to, only one has really taken any interest.

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If you have experience with other physical challenges, then this isn’t going to be that unfamiliar (hopefully). A lot of it is about understanding and appreciating your biology. Learning the basics, making sense of how diopters move focal planes, getting that connection how your darling eyeballs are creating vision.

It’s fascinating, really. If only someone was a better story teller, making it all come together that way. :thinking: :joy:

From there if you have context, it’s easier to appreciate what happens in lower light, or with stress, or after a long day of close-up. Can all add up to a much greater appreciation of yourself and your eyes. And with that, improving everything about your ongoing experience of vision.

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Yeah, that does not work that way. If you wake up with “bad vision day” then on that day it does not matter what you do: it will never be as good as on your good days. But your habits on that day matter in the next day and definitely matter in the long run.
So you should not have good habits to see good on a given day. You should have good habits to see good on the long run.

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Sometimes it’s a bad night’s sleep for me - so keep that in mind!:wink: Or Nutrition? Sports? Alcohol? Sugar?

And nope, can’t make anyone do anything, really.
BUT talking about it is the first drop. There might follow more, from other directions, and one day, maybe, he/she’s ready fo reven EM :wink:

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yes, alcohol, sugar, nutrition, sports, are all bad for your eyes…uh wait…maybe not all of them :wink:

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:joy: :joy: sports, always a bad idea! :wink:

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I am not going to stop because the good days are better than the days when I woke up and looked at things in a blurry haze. And thanks Jakey for being willing to reach out to those people that just might listen. I tell lots of people to go to endmyopia, so far only my niece did, but maybe some of those people will ask me why I quit wearing glasses!!! Gonna love that day. But I believe we are all here because we are those types of people that won’t settle. I really do appreciate what the whole endmyopia has done and what I have learned. I actually learned I had great anxiety about not seeing. When i first began to want to try to fix my sight. My anxiety was shown in a way I didnt know. I was scared to not be able to see, now i would drive without glasses if I really had to. Rant going to long but if any newbies read this post. Those frustrating days can make you feel like stopping but it’s always a learning experience so dont stop.

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Today I woke up and put my glasses on to discover I am seeing 20/20 20/15 both eyes. I reduced the left .25 to equalize just 9 days ago. I got some extra sleep but that is about all I did different.

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I would say its all about appreciating the small progress. I find that any improvements is better than none, although I guess after seeing improvements and then having bad days is kind of a terrible feeling.
I’m stuck on not making any progress since I started 6 months ago. Still can’t do active focus and not clear up blur. thats frustrating.

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This seems to be a mystery with many people AF is hard to define and harder to understand because so many people find it different. Before endmyopia I read Bates book and I was able to work on methods he described that helped me to find AF. One thing I did was to look at the stop sign near my house. Plenty of sun helped. I looked at the letters and tried to focus on a specific part of the letter. So I started at the O or something, I would look at the top or the bottom and try to see only that top part. Soon things would go blurry everywhere else and then I blinked and saw it all the same. It could be done with anything but letters are best. I would practice this in other situations and always without glasses. Getting things to blur up made my eyes want to see clear. It is a bit uncomfortable to do but that is where I started. Plus nothing wrong with reading Bates method to get an understanding of a few of the ways he helped patients.

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I’m with you - one day the vision is super sharp and the next, you can’t make out a car license plate at the distance they normally pop out clear at you.

I did dabble in intermittent fasting last year and noticed how my vision stayed constant and sharp for weeks on end.

And another time I cut out sugary drinks for a week and boom! Could see the Snellen sharper than ever in my new Normz (which I’ve since discarded with in favour of my stronger Normz) since this yo yo up and down vision cycle seems to have no end in sight!

Good days and bad days, it seems.

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Yeah unfortunately the stories of constant improvement beyond the first 1-2 diopters due to ciliary spasm and overprescription seem to be few and far between :neutral_face:must be really hard. Well a lot of people working on it now so we’ll see in at most 3 years how many people make it beyond the first improvements

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It is a bit of a mental block to remove the idea that 20/20 vision will not happen. I am working on rewiring my brain to believe my eyes are capable of seeing perfect without glasses. I know we have to be able to get that believe in our mind because that will help the process between the eyes and brain connection.
And yes Lajos sometimes I think the progress stories can make the beginner feel like it isnt working for them. It helps knowing people’s struggle with the process so you know you are not alone in a certain area. Like some of the discussion about eye pain and flashes. It helps to know other people feel those things.
Hopefully it won’t be 3 years until I reach 20/20 but I still have a lifetime of glasses if I do nothing so 3 years is less than the lifetime.

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Of course you are right and either way every diopter counts

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Just want to note also that hormones in general can affect your vision. You may know that they usually tell pregnant women not to get an eye exam because it won’t be accurate. Also, at some points during a normal menstrual cycle you can experience blurred vision due to hormone fluctuation. I think those of us who are tracking our vision so closely are really sensitive to even minute changes that others wouldn’t notice. When I notice I’m having a bad vision day I try to remind myself that it can’t ALWAYS be something I’m doing “wrong” and it doesn’t mean my eyes are getting worse. I definitely do have some days with a lot of clarity and then the next day I may struggle to even focus. I try to keep my eyes on the prize and not get too nervous about it. I’m sure even people with 20/20 vision have “off” days, you know?

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I’m sure even people with 20/20 vision have “off” days, you know?
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Hopefully it isnt .50 dioptors of loss lol
But yeah it is more sensitivity to changes after you start to reverse the years of "prescription " lenses

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I can confirm that my 20/15 wife has off vision days too, where she says sometimes things are blurry and she gets afraid that she needs glasses, but spending some time away from the screen clears things up and she can see again. She mentioned to me how when she uses the computer all day for work without a break, her eyes take a long time to focus on objects farther away. This is essentially ciliary spasm, and for that reason I have measured my ciliary spasm in part by how long it takes me to bring objects into focus.

And yeah. The off days are so frustrating, and can last weeks. But if you are diligent, sometimes you’re rewarded one day where your eyes just “pop into place” and everything is suddenly clearer, permanently. It’s the best feeling, but it takes a lot of trudging through bad days sometimes.

I don’t know if this is frowned upon, but recently I started doing mini cheat days where I’ll up my glasses by 0.25 diopters and spend 30 minutes to an hour on usual places that I walk to reestablish clarity, before doing a zero diopter reset back to my usual normalized power.

Definitely the #1 thing that has helped me is consistent sleep. If I get less than 8 hours, it’s almost guaranteed to be a blurry day. Interestingly, though, when I get exactly 5-6 hours, sometimes it’s sharper for half the day, before becoming extra blurry for the next 2 days. Perhaps it’s the adrenaline? I dunno.

Yes I suppose we dont really hear people talk about their blurry perfect eyes as much. Interestingly my brother went to the eye doctor because he was having night vision trouble. The assistant said his eyes were great the Optometrist said he needed glasses.
I didnt know he even had any trouble but ended up calling that day telling him about endmyopia, because I was excited. So i told him dont wear the glasses just take breaks to look in the distance. He had a job looking close up at wiring. Well he started a new job in sales and is outside walking, so I asked him How is your vision doing? He said he hadn’t put much thought to it but now that I was asking he hasn’t felt like he couldn’t see!

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