How long does your active focus last?

My questions would be:

  1. How long your AF usually lasts? (different kind of answers are acceptable here, eg.: “x seconds”, “until I blink”, “cannot tell, it’s always on”)
  2. How much time do you spend looking at a fixed distanced plane (screen, phone, book) a day? (some hour estimation is fine, don’t need to get into fine details)
  3. Have you ever noticed that your AF lasts longer than usual? If yes, how long it was, and what difference can you tell about the circumstances?

Some explanation:
So I started think based on this topic: Slowwwwly working through lessons | First update | -3 both eyes

As I mentioned there for me AF almost always lasts for only a few seconds, most of the time it starts drifting to blur without any blinking, and blinking resets it (which does not seems to be the case for everyone: Do you find that Active Focus resets after you blink? ). The exception is when I have a lot of continuous distance vision (like 3-4 hours plus), when I seemingly move into “auto-AF” where I don’t notice when I have AF, but everything is really clear (though I had no chance to check it on Snellen so far, because this usually means hiking or traveling all day and so on).

And so I started thinking. I have horrible close-up habits. I mean I work 8 hours on computer, my weekday free-time revolve around computer (maybe books, not much better). I take breaks, and improving so everything is fine at that regards. But maybe I have this short AF experience because I always have to re-release ciliary spasm when I start doing distance vision and usually don’t have enough continuous time to totally release it and experience a longer AF?

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1)" until I blink", after 1 blink somtime clarity come again sometime 2 to 3 blink

2)my work does not involve in screen , my time on phone Just for entrainment which might 3 hour a day
3) yes one time ,i remember I get clarity after single blink . 1 to 2 mints long last . Very slowly blink and opening my eyes

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How long does your AF usually last? (different kind of answers are acceptable here, eg.: “x seconds”, “until I blink”, “cannot tell, it’s always on”)
I find it easier to control when I’m relaxed, well-rested, and have been practicing good ciliary balance habits. When I’m tired or over-spasmed, it’s harder. But usually, AF works as long as the challenge isn’t too great, and I’m not over-tired.

How much time do you spend looking at a fixed distanced plane (screen, phone, book) a day? (some hour estimation is fine, don’t need to get into fine details)
I work on the computer, too, and I’m studying for an examination that is computer-based, so I end up with many more hours a day than I prefer. Especially working from home, the usual meetings that would give my eyes some variety aren’t happening. I do take breaks, and I make it a point to eat outside at breakfast, lunch and dinner if possible. I also take one hour yoga classes without any correction as many days a week as possible (sometimes up to 8 classes per week). I don’t watch TV, but sometimes I overuse my smartphone.

Have you ever noticed that your AF lasts longer than usual? If yes, how long it was, and what difference can you tell about the circumstances?
As previously mentioned, it’s better when I’m less tired. I find that the difference isn’t how long the active focus lasts, it’s the amount of correction it can provide and the overall less clarity I experience when tired or eyes stressed.

I hope this helps.

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  1. until I blink again - though I’d like to mention that it often improves the longer I look without blinking. So essentially I will blink a few times, each time I open my eyes get what feels like a random “setting” of sharpness until I get one that is sharper than the others, then I stare intently at the thing I want to see clearly (works best when it’s something geometric). It clears up until I blink again, which feels like a reset. But if I do this frequently over two to three hours, I consistently get clearer vision on more blinks, and start seeing details that I didn’t see before, and I will see better for several hours or even days after a session like that.

  2. 13 hours

  3. As I mentioned above, if I focus on intending to see, I can get the image to clear up better and for longer. This works especially well when I’m looking at something with high contrast, sharp lines and/or geometric shapes. And yes, I’ve definitely noticed that when I’m tired at night I struggle much more to see clearly. Best time for me has been in the early afternoon when there is a lot of light on the thing I’m looking at. Also found that it works better if I do active focus on something that is way in the distance (50 meters away) than something that is say, only 3-7 meters away.

(For context: started at -3.25 in March 2020, went cold turkey on contacts due to covid lockdown and new glasses getting stuck in the mail. Have been moving around in the range of roughly -2.5 to -1.5 depending on how good of a moment I’m having. No astigmatism worth mentioning, both eyes the same. Edit: I do struggle with blur adaptation double vision from going straight off of glasses, so take my experience with a pinch of salt.)

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  1. Very wide range of experience here:
  • Sometimes things clear up for 2-3 seconds and blur back. I need to blink to reset it. This usually correlates with dark overcast days (and overcast days usually correlate with more screentime but who knows). Generally when this happens I use a lot of intention (and tension) to activate AF because my eyes are not feeling cooperative.
  • Sometimes, especially on good bright days (even the overcast days that are not too gloomy), it activates effortlessly and stays until I blink. Though sometimes I experience ghosting the more I stare.
  • Blinking always resets the fun, regardless of how long AF would last otherwise.
  1. Highly variable. Over 10 hours on cloudy/rainy days, no more than a few hours on bright warm days. Depends also on how much work I have or how much of a potato I feel. I have not noticed a clear correlation between my screen habits and worsened vision the next day though. At least not since I learned to control smartphone use and migrated most of my hobbies to PC.

  2. Yes. It usually correlates with good lighting, good mood, good energy, and lack of tension. At the end of a long relaxing walk for example (=no ciliary spasm, low stress, good energy).

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I think the process of active focus is different but each person should see some level of maturation, meaning, some way of noting it changing for the better (length of time, how the eye feels, etc).

For me I can start to now actively choose to focus within a certain distance (about 20-40ft) what I mean is I can not see something or experience blur and then feel the muscle change to focus at the different distance. But leading up to that it was a few random seconds of focus blink and then gone, or an in focus then out of focus then gone, etc.

The key to remember is its “active” focus you should be trying to do something. A push up is an active exercise it is very ineffective when done passively.

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