More eye floaters?

I’ve been strict carnivore for the last couple weeks and my floaters are currently completely gone. I’m looking for them as I type this and I can’t find one floater. I am not currently on any fasting protocol. I am eating several times a day.

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Thanks for sharing. Just an English clarification… I’m not sure about the meaning of “strict carnivore”… you mean you hate a lot of meat or you avoid to eat meat. Not kidding. I think you mean you ate a lot of meat but it seems to be against the tide of nutrition recommendation. Sorry for the silly question!

Ciao! @Mickypenna

Carnivore is a meat-eater (= one who eats meat),
and saying “strict” would suggest he’s serious with himself about it.

As for floaters that suddenly disappear, this seems kind of magical. @Robohobo can you elaborate a bit about your before vs after situation regarding the floaters? Thanks in advance!

I’ve had massive floaters remembering back as far as age 9. They would be so bad that they would distract me even under low light conditions when im not even trying to look for them. I’ve been experimenting with different diets for the past few years because of my prediabetic status. And it seems that keto, fasting, and carnivore alleviate my floaters. The only issue some people have with this is if they stop any diet, the floaters come back. I am now committed to staying on the carnivore diet after trying it out a few times and seeng the degeneration that occurs when I quit it.

Of the three methods, i would say carnivore is the most successful and fasting with a standard American diet is the least successful.

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An additional bonus is I don’t sunburn anymore. Which makes sense because we didn’t evolve within walking distance of an Abercrombie and Fitch. Don’t take my word for it, experiment for yourself.

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@Robohobo Many thanks for the additional background and context. Great to hear you’re doing so well!

FWIW, I’m a keto’er too (not “strict” carnivore as I eat plenty of leafy green salads, but lots of meat, cheese, eggs, poultry, fish and zero extraneous carbs).

I’ve had floaters for years - never thought they were an oddity but a normal part of eye health. I can’t say I see any difference post-keto eating, but hey, that’s just my n=1 experience thus far.

Onward!

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It might be a useful clue to point out that my family has a history of issues with oxalates and even on keto i made a good effort to avoid oxalate rich foods. Doing so has removed my chronic muscle pain and might have something to do with the floaters as well.

@SomeGuy thanks to clarify my stupid doubt.
@Robohobo that’s interesting! I’m omnivore, but I try to reduce meat intake, it seems recent studies show relation between meat and some health issue. I don’t mean to judge your diet with this sentence. I thought eye floaters can be reduced with proper hydration and a diet full of fruits and vegetable (my ophthalmologist opinion). I’m following this advice but I can’t find any difference in eye floaters. Unfortunately.
Please update if you face any further change in floaters related to diet. Thanks.

I’ll be tracking this closely as i spend more time on this diet for sure. I’ve gone through every major diet for 6 months trials including veganism (plant based whole foods) and i can safely say that carnivore or high meat paleo is the best for my set of issues. YMMV. Cheers!

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Removing oxalates has done wonders for my joints, especially my left hip which was causing me a lot of pain and limping. After 10 months carnivore it has virtually disappeared - on top of losing another 10kg of surplus fat. I have not paid enough attention to floaters to know if it has reduced them. In fact, after a month in Darjeeling the big floater in my weaker left eye has become more noticeable, but to me it seems simply a shift in position, from the periphery to the centre, and I am quite happy to ignore it as usual.
I found out before coming here whether the altitude (2.100 m) would affect vision, but it does not seem to do so before about 3000m, although there could also be subtler differences at this altitude. Whatever the case, my month in Darjeeling has done little to improve my vision, but I cannot really tell until I am back home in a month’s time and able to test it on my usual 6m Snellen and in similar light conditions. We have had a great deal of low cloud and fog for most of the time.

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Update: I just recently broke diet with grains and dairy this week and now my floaters are rampant. I haven’t had any vegetables fwiw.

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I have eaten only animal based food for the last year, with wonderful results, but I do eat dairy (cheese, hard and soft). I love it, and as I have Dutch genes I have convinced (or misled) myself that I tolerate it well. I have been trying to build up the motivation to cut it out for a 3 month trial, and I think you have just given me a sufficiently strong one.

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Thanks a lot for your update.
I see meat based diet works good for you about floaters. This really makes me thinking a lot and it’s controvertial for me if trying or not a diet strictly on animal based food.
I can’t significantly report any change in floater from my side. I had just a couple of days of strictly juice fasting but my floaters didn’t change in numbers while they seem a bit less sharp than usual. Boost of energy levels while on juice fast, but I wasn’t able to go longer in that moment (mentally).
As I wrote in other places in the forum about floaters I think we can’t get rid of them unfortunately and you confirm this saying that “floaters are rampant”, immediately after a pretty ‘normal’ nutrition change.
Still remain the fact that I have my field of view full of floaters and this bother me a lot. Working daily of myopia brings the attentio to floaters constantly.
Thanks for sharing @Robohobo

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Please let us know if you do. I feel like while this isn’t very scientific, we can collectively narrow down the potential causes of floaters. I will be testing out grains separately after I achieve a couple weeks of floater free vision again. It will be a good excuse to eat a fat stack of bagels😏

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I don’t understand to be honest how you guys think diet will affect any existing floaters. OK I admit I haven’t read too much about them but they are clumps of vitreous material - how would nutrients from food entering your bloodstream affect clumps of (dead?) material which are not connected to your bloodstream? Or am I missing something?

Floaters can move out of the line of sight, slowly reduce in size, or be resorbed completely (by phagocytes, but this is a slow process). The vitreous is nourished, and this nutrition comes from our diet. So a good anti-inflammatory diet could speed up the resorption of floaters and prevent new ones from being formed. One cause of floaters is uveitis. An increase in white blood cells in the eye is often accompanied by new floaters. Diabetic retinopathy can also create many floaters, and poor nutrition plays a huge role here. Age seems to be a major factor.

I have only started my investigation of this rabbit hole, and suspect there is much more to learn.

I have had floaters come and go. At present there is only one obvious floater in each eye, and I have had more than this is the past, especially in the more myopic left eye. I definitely had more floaters before I reversed my diabetes with a change in diet alone.

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Hmm, the vitreous is nourished? I cannot debate this as I don’t know but I thought it was some gel stuff that is not connected to the bloodstream… interesting. How can floaters be absorbed? Do they dissolve and then get carried away in the bloodstream?

Autophagy could explain things, but autophagy happens when you not eat, and not when you eat certain things. So while it’s nutrition, it’s not that kind of nutrition :smiley:

Of course if certain diet could increase autophagy, then the connection is there…

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I suppose in the same way that all other dead or defective cells in the body are recycled. Fasting increases autophagy, and this may be a reason why floaters may disappear faster after a few days of fasting.

‘Since the vitreous acts as a metabolic repository for the retina, hyalocytes and surrounding tissues [3], some of the proteins in vitreous humor could be contributed by these surrounding tissues. … Vitreous humor does not have any blood vessels but is nourished by vessels of the retina and the ciliary body.’

From https://clinicalproteomicsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1559-0275-11-29

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Autophagy takes place all the time, but is speeded up in fasting. It also increases with intermittent fasting. Ketogenic diets also increase autophagy. But I see your point about ‘no nutrition’ being an aspect of nutrition.

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