Something about 20/20/20 and low myopia

First post here. I have 1.00 diopters on both eyes with moderate astigmatism.

When taking a break from screen time, should I wear my glasses (full prescription, I have no diff and norm) when doing the 20/20/20 rule?

My correction on astigmatism isn’t on full correction as my optometrist said I shouldn’t be using my full prescription on astigmatism as it’s my first time wearing glasses.

Welcome to the forum.

It’s a pity you even started. Do you have a 6m Snellen eye chart? If you do, what line can you read with your glasses? What line can you read without your glasses? Your measurements on the Snellen will indicate whether you should be using glasses at all. You could use your full prescription for driving or other situations where you need very sharp vision, but if you feel you need glasses for other middle or distance vision tasks, you would want to use -.75 norms and no more correction than that. Don’t ever let them correct you for astigmatism if it is now very low- I think all astigmatics on the forum would agree with me.

p.s. Don’t take this as diopter advice - it is what the EM method suggests. You may want to do a bit more reading before you take any decisions. :grinning:

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Just as a note: there is no “20/20/20 rule” in Endmyopia. It’s a mainstream optometrist advice, which is not endorsed by Jake.

Also for such low myopia as you have, you only need glasses to give your eyes and visual cortex a taste of full clarity and make sure you don’t get blur adapted. So I don’t think for regular breaks they are needed, especially is you do the breaks in well lit places.

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Nope, at your level of low myopia you can challenge your eyesight at a distance very well without glasses. In fact I think your full prescription would hinder you when active focusing.
Notice that to release ciliary spasm, you do not simply look at a distance. You need to challenge yourself to read something far away. There would be no challenge for you if you use glasses. I always take breaks without glasses, and if I want to wear glasses, I make sure it is only after releasing the ciliary spasm that I do it.

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It’s a start though towards releasing ciliary spasm. At -1D, just taking your glasses off for near work would help even more.

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Absolutely important, as this is where most of us started on our journey of increasing myopia.

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My opinion is that for release 20 sec is not enough. And it’s better to have less frequent, but longer breaks. Jake’s reasoning against it that while initially you are motivated to have breaks every 20 minutes when you are less motivated you will simply forget it / won’t do it. So again, better having less frequent but longer breaks.

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Fortunately I have a natural dislike of looking at a screen for longer than 20 minutes, or even sitting at my computer for that long, and I get up, move around, and do something else, for much longer than 20 seconds. But then I am retired and do not earn my living at a screen, so that is easy for me. What I look at over the top of my smallish screen is also further away than 6 m - 8m to the French windows and 65 km or more to the mountains I can see through them, with plenty of other distances in between. This is the advantage of living in a converted barn in the middle of the countryside.
Even looking up at my ceiling when lying on my sofa gives me a good distance. That brush against the wall, used for getting rid of spider webs, has a handle 4 metres long. The apex of the ceiling is 5.5 metres. Alas, I now see the spider webs more often than I used to. :spider_web:

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Beautiful ceiling! Incredibly interesting.

The original oak beams, but the rest of the roof had to be renewed when I bought this ruin 33 years ago.

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I was in a winery in Virginia 20 plus years ago that imported some giant beams from somewhere in Europe I think. Seems like they were hundreds of years old. Made for beautiful and memorable experience. Definitely the best part of the tour.

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The part of the barn you see here was a later extentsion, and the beams in the original very small house and barn are even older. Woodworm and death watch beetle everywhere, but the beams will definitely outlive me. The heart of old oak is very hard indeed. But we are derailing the topic. Sorry Monzaru, this happens on the forum all the time, and please feel free to complain.We can shift this derailment to the Off Topic section.

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To get back on topic, I find wood grain excellent to focus on and discover new, finer details as my ciliary releases or diopters reduce.

And @Ursa has the perfect example!

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Nice move! :smile:

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Thank you David. I heard an optometrist mention it in a video recently and was wondering if it was an industry idea or endmyopia.

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