That's no moon! Photoshop challenge

So there has been some talk lately about what is astigmatic blur vs ghosting vs double vision. I typically use the moon as a gauge for how much astigmatism I have with a particular script. Here is an image of the moon I found in the public domain as an example:

This is my simple artist rendition what my naked left eye sees when I am looking at the actual moon in real life.

This is my naked right eye.

This is both nudists working together.

I got to thinking… maybe we could have a thread where the artistically or photoshoply enabled people to help others understand what each person’s refractive state looks like. If drawing is your thing, then feel free to draw the moon and upload.

10 Likes

I’m not artistic…
image

2 Likes

Wow, I was just looking at the moon earlier on, and wondering how to describe how I perceive it with naked eyes, and here you go. It certainly looks nothing like yours!. Both images are far too messy to draw, but neither of them have an actual separation of images. The left eye has many more overlapping images than the right and they seem to cluster more to the left of the main image. The right eye has overlapping images to the left and to the right. Neither has the clear direction of ghost images you have shown. With both eyes, the right eye image dominates, as it is a lot less myopic. .
What is interesting for me is that I no longer have almost fully separated moons, as I used to have. Sign of improvement?

2 Likes

My real sight is a bit messier than depicted. I just wanted to give a general idea of what my level of astigmatism and axis type produces. Maybe I’ll try making one with a little more detail soon.

The last time I noticed, I think I only saw one additional image and it shifted just a fraction of the moons width. This was corrected vision though. No recent reference.

I did compare a few stars last night with and without lenses. Has there been any discussions of star viewing or just point sources in general?

I think I’ve seen mentions of people using street lights as a point of reference.