The Devil's Serpent Defanged! Active Focus: Steiner's Myopia-Killer

Hi everyone. Hope all of you are well.

First, I’d like to address the mystique surrounding Active Focus™️. Keep in mind this is my experience only. If I may give my opinion, AF is nothing more than your eyes adjusting to the lens you put in front of them, like when you put on glasses and have to blink to focus. The trick is to only have a small amount of blur, and your eyes CAN clear it at least partially if not 100%. It’s just the eye’s focusing mechanism. There are some conditions to make this easier which I will discuss later. My point is, I do not believe the principle behind EndMyopia was ever to “find” this. It is just a thing to be done. Go outside with normalized, look at stuff. Guess what? You are active focusing. Don’t do what I did, telling yourself “Oh I can’t active focus”; just go get stimulus outside. Your eyes will do it for you in optimal conditions. As @NottNott says, distance vision is the key to myopia reversal.

I am saying that I officially “found” Active Focus. I only really tested my dominant right eye since it’s weaker and I need it to catch up. This is how it went for me. I found that the brain has a large role in our vision. You have to want to see, not with your eyes but with your mind. If you’re tired and/or stressed it will not work. If you try to blink and try to clear blur, it will not work. Blinking will reset active focus. You need to make sure that you get enough sleep. Go in front of the snellen, there is some foginess. If you try to clear it you will fail. Just relax and look at it gently. Give it some time, you’ll notice it starts dimming into focus, but its very warpy and slow. It’s not a quick flash. If your mind is tired/restless you will have trouble. You need to be completely mentally relaxed. I have just tried with my normalized (0.75 under official Rx) both Zenni AND polycarbonate lenses. It feels as if there is a pulling feeling in the eye and forehead. Not necessarily painful, just a pulling. There’s also an orgasmic-like tingling in the head above the eye. It kind of felt like my surroundings dimmed as the chart came into focus.

The big question: can you control AF? The answer is complicated. Active focus is very fickle and unstable. You can’t literally “do” it. You can only create the right environment for it, and let it come naturally. When you go to poop, no matter how hard you try, that poop is not going to come out until you relax your mind. Otherwise, you will just spasm. You have to relax your mind and use it to focus carefully without being strenuous. There are a few habits that I think can help.

  1. Get rid of ciliary spasm
  2. Get a lot of sleep: 7-8 hours
  3. Keep your eyes lubricated
  4. Stretch your body to increase blood circulation.
  5. Gently wash your eyes
  6. Keep your mind alert
  7. Limit smartphone for essential use only
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I agree on most of what you’re saying even though it seems like everybody has a different AF experience…

i tried that relaxed approach and it did work a couple of times, but eventually couldn’t keep up with it as I would get nervous every time.

When you go to poop, no matter how hard you try, that poop is not going to come out until you relax your mind.

Thanks for that very ‘down to earth’ analogy :grin:

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The young endmyopians grow up so quickly :sob:

Now if you gave this explanation to yourself when you were first starting out and being super anxious I bet you woulda still struggled and took a long time to get to where you are now :wink:

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Either I was using AF naturally before EM and do it instinctively, or I haven’t found it yet. If it’s as simple as @Iceghoull says I’m great. If it’s some big experience as others have said, I’m still lost.

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This sums it up. It’s great that you are trying to demystify AF - it’s a stumbling block for many.

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Maybe, but the point I’m making is that the impression given off is that there’s a thing you have to find to be successful with the method. I’m saying if we move to something more based on good habit-building, it would be good. For example, if you’re at that stage where you’re starting out, it doesn’t make sense mentally to want to change your habits not knowing if it’s going to work, and also knowing you can’t “do” AF. It becomes kind of a catch-22 in that you don’t want to do anything unless you see progress, but you obviously won’t progress until you do something. I’m saying changing habits aren’t just an extra bonus, they literally create the environment needed for AF. So I agree with you that AF is the product of good lifestyle choices.

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The important thing is to create good habits. Your eyes will focus whether you want them to or not. Active focus is just having a higher quality of focus. The experience depends on what you’re doing to facilitate its occurrence. Even if you do “find” AF, you won’t get progress unless you habitually use it.

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Nowadays I like to compare AF to slowing down your pulse. You definitely can do it but not by “wanting” it. Moreover, the more you try to force it, the less you are able to achieve it.

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Ye I hear you, people may get this impression that you have to “know how” to AF to be successful, and that this may trap people into being hesitant until they make progress.
Also, I agree that good habits/lifestyle choices are core to AF, and that it’s likely worthwhile for EndMyopia to have more emphasis on that for the sake of newcomers.

Where I’m not sympathetic though is how people got this impression in the first place.I never got this impression, but I may be an outlier because I was aware of the AF phenomenon before I got anywhere close to EndMyopia or anything of its like. Regardless, I’m glad you’re leading the charge to fight off this impression though.

I don’t think this could be explained any better :star_struck:

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Don’t get me wrong, it’s not easy. Not at all. It’s like trying to get a match to light. You have to try it a few times, but it can be stubborn and won’t light. Every time you want to light it you have to go through this lighting process. With AF, I believe it is similar, because you’re essentially pushing your eyes to focus more than they’re comfortable with. Sometimes you can focus worse, sometimes better (AF), or normal. AF is just the description of that higher quality focus. It’s not really a learnable skill, it’s just something to be mindful of when trying to focus.

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Hey Paul, Is this an essential key when doing active focus?

I got thrown at the beginning too. I found AF quite quickly, but then I was getting more involved in the EM community, and AF was such a big deal for people… Made me doubt I had it, but eventually I really sat down with the resources and had a big study session and concluded that what I was doing WAS in fact AF, and that AF really wasn’t that big of an event. Now I have no doubt at all that I am doing it, and I find my results can be dramatically different depending which stage I am at in my reduction cycle (fresh norms? Comfortable norms? etc). Of course I can’t see with your eyes, but I reckon you have it.

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I have 4 different types of AF:

  1. casual (without putting any effort or thought, just a blink clears up basic blur)
  2. casual but deliberate (moderate effort)
  3. Intense (lot of Effort)
  4. clear flash (20/20 clear flash that I can hold for 20-40 sec) but I can’t control its onset and cannot hold it for very long.

With Active Focus, I have realized that it gets as better as the effort put in. Once I reached around - 2.00 to -1.75, I had assumed that my eyes would just get better on auto-pilot. But, 4 months later, they were in the same ball park without much improvement. Then, (2 months ago) I again started pushing for some intense AF, and immediately I started seeing improvements. I feel like it is similar to building a muscle. The more you push the muscle, faster you will be able to build the muscle. (Of course, one can overdo it and burn out). The point I am trying to make is that just as a muscle will not build itself automatically and needs deliberate (and pretty intense) exercise, the eye (active focus) also seems to behave similarly.

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I seriously doubt it. I never have anything like this, but I do from time to time experience different visual effects that I notice because, well, I’m being mindful about vision. Active focus is natural, autonomous, but like a lot of autonomous systems, you can take some control (like breathing). The feedback is noticing when it’s taken place. I think a lot of people sit on the mountain and try to clear up the details miles away, when sitting across the room and clearing up the tile joints, or electrical outlets, would work just as well.

It can be a big experience the first time you do it “under control,” as mentioned above. Of course, control starts out a little wobbly, but as you gain more experience practicing it, it becomes easier and easier until it’s almost natural to “tune up” the visual inputs for the object you’re looking at at the distance you’re observing it.

I hope this helps.

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Thank you Kem.

When I first glance at text or odd shapes at distance, it’s often a bit blurred. After a blink, or a quick look away and back, or even just a few seconds stare, the image may clear a bit. It’s mostly natural with little input from me so I’m hesitant to call it AF. Never a big difference.

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That’s it exactly. It’s not like going from no glasses to glasses; it’s just a subtle improvement.

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Then my hours watching TV and reading subtitles at 17 feet, 5.2 meters, aren’t a complete waste of time!

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Well…as long as you’re under-corrected and doing active focus. As well, one should avoid overusing a fixed focal plane. The ciliary likes a variety of focal plane changes on a regular basis. Making these focal plane changes with active focus both stimulates the visual cortex and exercises the ciliary muscles and lens, in my opinion, both of which are helpful to restoring the eyes to their natural functioning.

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Agreed. I’m dealing with presbyopia as well as myopia so I make a point of taking my ciliary to both extremes regular.

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I agree with Kem, just my experience. I don’t know.

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