Using the astigmatism tool properly

I would like to get some clarity from someone who has a little more experience with the printable astigmatism tool found on endmyopia.

Measuring Axis Number
Step 3. Focus on the indicator dial line, slowly moving back until you start to see blur.
I’m assuming the indicator dial line is the one with the arrow?

Step 4. Turn the dial until the line with the arrow becomes clear.
During this step do I continue focusing on and following line with the arrow while turning it? Or am I supposed to focus somewhere more central?

Measuring Cylinder Number
Is it necessary to measure cylinder with the tool in the same Axis degree position for the eye being tested?

It’s possible that I’m over complicating this, just want to be sure I’m measuring correctly.

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I’m assuming the indicator dial line is the one with the arrow?

Yes!

During this step do I continue focusing on and following line with the arrow while turning it?

Yes!

Is it necessary to measure cylinder with the tool in the same Axis degree position for the eye being tested?

Yes!

Hope that helps :slight_smile:

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I had exactly the same doubts! May I give a friendly suggestion? I think it would be good to update the instructions in the tool to include these clarifications. The main reason I asked to join the forum was to see if these questions would have been answered here…
Cheers!

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It does! I had a feeling that I was over complicating it. Thanks!

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How acurate can this paper tool be? My perscription say L 80 R 110. Measuring with this tool I see clear lines between L 70-90 and R 105-115.

And there you have it, so it’s quite accurate for axis but not very accurate. The optometrist isn’t always very accurate either as I noticed. However this tool is not accurate for measuring the cylinder power in my opinion

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I had the same issue and chose the middle one of the clear lines. When later measured by an optometrist, I was found to be 110 instead of 120 in the left eye. I did the same for the right eye, and that was confirmed by the optometrist as 50. I wonder how important it is to be spot on. Measuring the cylinder power was much more difficult, but even here the two optometry measurements I had for that did not match - out by .25.
I see you have mirror image oblique astigmatism, as I do.

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Im fairly new to all of this so I might ask really dumb questions/ Here is one.
My closeup vision seems fine not blurry but double. I assume this means I need to correct my close up astigmatism. If so can you buy reading glasses with only a CYL/AXIS correction. Or ignore reading glasses and try to correct the astigmatism naturally through exercise?

Current perscription: R --1.00 Cyl -0.75 Axis 110. L -0.75 Cyl -1.50 Axis 80.

You won’t be able to just “correct astigmatism through excercise”

Never heard of reading glasses with CYL correction. Axis doesn’t need correction, it just shows the direction in which your sight is the best (90 degrees from this angle is the direction in which your CYL correction value applies).

Imagine how many reading glasses a grocery store would have to stock to cover even a few combinations of cyl power and axis.

plus reading glasses have a + lens not a - lens. You have myopia not hyperopia.

so yeah, you’ll have to order some custom-made lenses on any of the sites people use Zenni, Eye buy direct etc. If your sphere is so low, then for close-up you could order something without sph correction but I read somewhere this is weird for the eyes when you have CYL, so optometrists usually add some sphere to equalise the vision in all directions a bit but I can’t help you with the details of that - best to get an optometrist to help or at least a test lens kit to try out some combinations (but it’s hard to select your completely new prescription yourself)

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Thank you for the explaination. And yes im planning a trip to the optometrist.

If you explicitly tell them you’d like some reduced power computer glasses they’re usually more helpful than if you tell them you are following some “crazy” myopia reducing scheme :wink: they are usually willing to reduce the sphere power (if not the cyl) for computer glasses and hopefully they’ll be knowledgable enough to set it up so your eyes are comfortable.

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Did anyone see this vision tracker tool on kickstarter?
EyeQue vision tracker

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Yes, but I sent it back and got the PVT, which doesn’t kick my fitness watch off. :smile:

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I’m thinking of measuring my real need for cylinders in my next years efforts. Tell me, why on earth does it need to be corrected the astigmatic angle which you see clearly? Are the axis numbers correct on the dial (90 L/R, 0/180 up)? My opto gave me a differing map (0 on the right, 90 up, 180 left). Also on the blog page there’s several pictures with differing versions of the axis’. Could the axis maps be different in Europe compared to Usa? Probably not, but just to be sure before ordering anything from abroad. Looking at the dial on the screen shortly, the other line is blurry. Just feels funny to correct the axis to the line that’s sharp. I too printed the crappy one from the pdf, so I’ll have to go back to the library. :wink:

Wikipedia explains it all, including the cylinder notations used in different parts of the world. You can skip to the section on cylinder.


The opto I saw used the + notation and the ophthalmo the - notation. This was pretty confusing until I looked it up.

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As Hannie says, there are two equivalent notations. One has negative astigmatic power and the axis shows your strongest meridian (without cyl power) and one has positive astigmatic power and the axis shows the weakest meridian. In the end it’s equivalent, as you either have a more negative sph and add some cyl (so the pure sph power is only for your weakest angle) or you have less negative sph and subtract some cyl D (so the pure sph power is only for your strongest angle/meridian)

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