Why does myopia stabilize in the 20s

I’ve introduced some friends/neighbors to endmyopia. They are still reading and on the fence, because I just started out and have not made much progress myself.
One question I got asked: why does myopia stabilize / plateau even though I haven’t changed my eye habits?

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I suggest that either you, or they, look for the answer on internet. :grinning: We are happy to help with some specific EM questions, but this is no alternative for doing your own research. Use the search function on the forum and also on the website and you will find most of your EM related questions already answered.

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Most likely you have changed, but you did not realize it. Like starting to work, or leaving to collage, or using less phone for some reason, gaming less, found some hobby, got a girlfriend, and so on… there is no magic link between 20s and myopia, just ask about the ton of people who got their myopia worsen way beyond their 30s.

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Mine progressed until my mid 40s. It only stopped then because I no longer went to an opto.

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This is not entirely true. Myopia DOES progress way more in the late pre-teens and teens and I believe is genetically pre-disposed to stop increasing as you stop growing. This happened with me, the worsening REALLY slowed down after 25 and I didn’t change my habits, in fact I started to work on the computer where as before I only used it for playing and internet. Of course myopia does keep increasing due to lens induced effects (Jake’s theory) but it would increase even more if it didn’t tend towards slowing down in the 20s

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Did you also go as frequently to the optometrist and changed glasses after 25 than before?

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hmm, let me see, I went regularly up till around age 27. When I got my prescription then I didn’t really wear the new one as I felt it was too strong

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Well, for one children adapt really fast, so it makes sense that myopia wod develop really fast with the corresponding stimulus. However, myopia still progresses later in life, especially given the stimulus. It may progress at a slower rate, but it does. Your habits to have to do with it, even if you have never noticed so far. Look at me for example. Myopia stopped at high myopia in late 20s, then startes to progress again in thirties with a different job and office with bad, bad lighting. My myopia went slightly back again when going into homeoffice at the beginning of the year (better screen, bigger desk, all day full sunlight, better habits).

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This all makes so much sense! Thank you all for sharing!

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just want to mention that our body tend to stabilize in our 20’s. Height tends to stop by atleast 20, periods mainly have stablizilized, our brains are always developing until 25, but its mainly stablilized. Bones, tissues and whatnot have developed, so it makes sense that our eye sight as well have stabilized.

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Yeah, the eye ball is still growing, I think, until around that age. But, I didn’t develop myopia until I was 24, and it just kept getting worse until I found EndMyopia, so no truth in that “vision stabalises at 20” for me.

But that may be a “rule” that was observed in a world before smart phone and screens for everything.
I don’t think it is true now that our lifestyles have changed to become so very screen- and close up-based.

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That is strange that it started so late for you. I mean sure it makes sense with the EM explanation but this is the first site where I even heard about myopia starting so late. Up till last year I had only heard of people having glasses since under age 10 or not having glasses for myopia

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Adult onset myopia seems to be about 25% of myopes.

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Trust the study to include “GEM” in the title.

Also, for me it was definitely related to 1. getting my first office job (8 hours at a computer) and 2. Getting my first smart phone.

I really think everything that was true about trends in myopia in the past is well and truly obsolete now that we have smartphone in front of our noses so much now.

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Yes, the environmental factor is now playing a much larger role. I often speculate on how many people are truly ‘genetically resistant’ to developing myopia, and in which population groups this resistance is strongest. I suspect we all know one or two of these people, and they make us grind our teeth. :grimacing:. I envied my daughter for a good many years for her resistance to myopia in spite of having a very similar environment. Now the tables are turned a little, and she envies me for my lack of presbyopia. Every cloud etc…

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Feel like this has been answered pretty well. But I’ll add my experience too: Got glasses at around 9, stabilized by about 15. Didn’t change at all until I started reducing. All fairness I gave up reading for pleasure due to migraines and I was outside as often as possible.
I think it is a combination of factors. In most cases you settle into a “normal” and your eyes do too. Also those that stabilize after graduating school and are not studying anymore, makes sense. Unless your habits change drastically like taking an office job as in Gemily’s case.
All that said there are still those that don’t stabilize without taking on real change like Kevin.

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I did go to college a decade late. I wish I had records to see how my eyesight changed then.

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